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  • Erratum
  • Open Access

Erratum to: understanding how perceptions of tobacco constituents and the FDA relate to effective and credible tobacco risk messaging: a national phone survey of U.S. adults, 2014–2015

  • 1, 2,
  • 3, 4,
  • 1, 2, 3, 4,
  • 1, 2,
  • 6,
  • 2, 5,
  • 2, 7 and
  • 1, 2Email author
BMC Public HealthBMC series – open, inclusive and trusted201717:726

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-017-4760-3

  • Received: 11 January 2017
  • Accepted: 14 September 2017
  • Published:

The original article was published in BMC Public Health 2016 16:516

Erratum

As reported in the original paper [1], the Center for Regulatory Research on Tobacco Communication conducted a telephone survey in 2014–2015 with a national sample of adults ages 18 and older living in the United States (N = 5014). Poverty level was determined using the household size and income reported by the respondents and applying the federal poverty numbers available from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2014. A coding error was made during the data recoding process such that 2.7% of respondents (n = 129) were incorrectly classified as living above the poverty line. Below are updated Tables 1, 2 and 4 presenting both the original and corrected estimates. No substantive conclusions reported in the paper were affected by this correction.
Table 1

Demographic characteristics as compared to U.S. Census and other national surveys, CRRTC National Adult (≥18 years) Phone Survey 2014–2015

 

Unweighted

Weighted

National estimate

% (n)

%

95% CI

%

ORIGINALLY REPORTED ESTIMATES

 Household Poverty

  At or above federal poverty level

84.0% (3901)

85.7%

(83.8–87.5)

84.6% [2]

  Below federal poverty level

16.0% (745)

14.3%

(12.5–16.2)

15.4% [2]

CORRECTED ESTIMATES

 Household Poverty

  At or above federal poverty level

81.3% (3772)

82.5%

(80.4–84.7)

84.6% [2]

  Below federal poverty level

18.7% (868)

17.5%

(15.3–19.6)

15.4% [2]

[2] US Census

Table 2

Percentage of smokers by selected demographic characteristics, CRRTC National Adult (≥18 years) Phone Survey 2014–2015

 

Weighted

National estimate

%

95% CI

%

95% CI

ORIGINALLY REPORTED ESTIMATES

 Household Poverty

  At or above federal poverty level

15.4%

(13.5–17.3)

15.2%

(14.6–15.9)

  Below federal poverty level

29.3%

(23.9–34.7)

29.2%

(27.5–31.0)

CORRECTED ESTIMATES

 Household Poverty

  At or above federal poverty level

15.1%

(13.2–17.1)

15.2%

(14.6–15.9)

  Below federal poverty level

27.9%

(22.9–32.9)

29.2%

(27.5–31.0)

Table 4

Subset of Communication-related Variables – CRRTC National Adult Phone Survey 2014–2015

 

Weighted Proportion or M with 95% Confidence Interval

ORIGINALLY REPORTED ESTIMATES

ORIGINALLY REPORTED ESTIMATES

CORRECTED ESTIMATES

Total

Living in poverty

Living in poverty

Information Seeking

 Have you ever looked for information on chemicals in cigarettes and cigarette smoke?

  Yes

27.5% (25.4–29.7)

25.7% (19.7–31.6)

24.1% (18.8–29.4)

  No

72.5% (70.3–74.6)

74.3% (68.4–80.3)

75.9% (70.6–81.2)

 In which 1 of these 3 places would you most like to see information on chemicals in cigarettes and cigarette smoke?

  On cigarette packs

54.8% (52.4–57.3)

54.3% (47.4–61.2)

54.6% (48.0–61.2)

  In stores

15.0% (13.2–16.7)

18.3% (13.2–23.5)

18.3% (13.6–23.1)

  Online

28.7% (26.5–30.9)

25.5% (19.7–31.4)

25.5% (20.2–30.9)

  Doesn’t know, refused, or doesn’t want information

1.5% (0.9–2.08)

1.8% (0.3–3.3)

1.5% (0.2–2.7)

Constituent Awareness

 Aware of 0 of 4 constituents in cigarette smoke

37.5% (35.0–40.1)

43.1% (35.7–50.4)

42.5% (35.5–49.5)

 Aware of 1 of 4 constituents in cigarette smoke

35.8% (33.4–38.2)

34.7% (28.2–41.2)

33.6% (27.6–39.7)

 Aware of 2 of 4 constituents in cigarette smoke

18.7% (16.7–20.7)

13.6% (9.8–17.5)

15.4% (9.3–21.6)

 Aware of 3 of 4 constituents in cigarette smoke

5.6% (4.6–6.5)

5.7% (3.0–8.4)

4.9% (2.7–7.2)

 Aware of 4 of 4 constituents in cigarette smoke

2.4% (1.7–3.1)

2.9% (0.8–5.1)

3.5% (1.4–5.7)

Knowledge of and Trust for FDA and U.S. Federal Government

 Have you ever heard of the FDA or Food and Drug Administration?

  Yes

94.6% (93.4–95.8)

87.5% (83.0–92.0)

87.1% (83.0–91.2)

  No

5.4% (4.2–6.6)

12.5% (8.0–17.0)

12.9% (8.8–17.0)

 Can the FDA effectively regulate tobacco products?

  Yes

65.2% (62.6–67.8)

67.8% (61.3–74.1)

69.9% (63.9–75.9)

  No

34.8% (32.2–37.4)

32.2% (25.8–38.7)

30.1% (24.1–36.1)

 How much trust do you have in the federal government? M score, 0 = none at all - 4 = a great deal

2.0 (1.9–2.0)

2.2 (2.0–2.4)

3.1 (2.9–3.2)

Note. Point estimates in bold text were found to be significantly different from their respective comparison group (e.g., smokers were compared to non-smokers, young adults compared to older adults, etc.) using either PROC SURVEYFREQ or PROC SURVEYREG to make the comparisons

Notes

Declarations

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Health Behavior, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), CB #7440, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7440, USA
(2)
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, UNC, CB #7295, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7295, USA
(3)
Carolina Survey Research Laboratory, UNC, 730 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA
(4)
Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, CB #74203101 McGavran-Greenberg Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7420, USA
(5)
Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, UNC, CB #7595Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7595, USA
(6)
Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
(7)
School of Media and Journalism, UNC, CB #3365, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7440, USA

Reference

  1. Boynton M, Agans R, Bowling J, Brewer N, Sutfin E, Goldstein A, et al. Understanding how perceptions of tobacco constituents and the FDA relate to effective and credible tobacco risk messaging: A national phone survey of U.S. adults, 2014–2015. BMC Public Health. 2016;16(1). doi:10.1186/s12889-016-3151-5.
  2. US Census. American Community Survey United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/acs. Accessed 21 Jan 2016.

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